Tagged in: docker

Uila – A view into your data center.

I recently had the chance to get a product overview of Uila.

 

What product does Uila have?

 

“Uila’s Application-Centric Infrastructure Monitoring Monitoring helps align business and IT Operations goals in a single product by providing IT Operations with the application visibility and correlated network, compute and storage insights for Private, Public and Hybrid Cloud-based Data Centers (such as VMWare, Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, Docker Container, etc.).  “

 

Ever need to see why your developer or application owner are indicating your virtual environment is causing performance issues to their application?? Of course, it’s not VMware, but it couple be something between the virtualization layer and the application layer causing performance issues.

 

 

 

 

Sounds Great. But what does that mean? How does it work?

 

 

 

 

How do I see into my environment ?

 

 

 

Uila Shows real time, and backwards in time so you can click and dig in.

 

 

Then you can dig into Application Analysis to see what is causing the problem.

 

 

Once you find the problem, in this case Oracle_11g-n1 looks suspect..  You can dig farther in.

 

 

 

Of course you can do a root cause view.

 

And find the problem.

 

 

 

 

For more information on Uila.

 

Videos

 

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Company Overview
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pgzx14PRpOs
http://vimeo.com/202704462

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Application Visibility and Root Cause
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1PeWccQZ5g
http://vimeo.com/202698494

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Infrastructure Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjH2CPdFT0s
http://vimeo.com/202701527

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – End User Experience Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-1ExHbRGgI
http://vimeo.com/202702132

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Virtual Network Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufqMYFVBlMA
http://vimeo.com/202702496

 

Data Sheet
http://uila.com/download/datasets/920/Uila_Datasheet_FullStack_Virtualization_Apr_2017.pdf

 

Check them out.

 

Thanks

 

Roger Lund

Big Switch – Big Cloud Fabric

A overview of Big Cloud Fabric

 

Big Switch labels Big Cloud Fabric, the ” Next-Gen Data Center Switching Fabric

From the above Link.

Big Cloud Fabric™ is the next-generation data center switching fabric delivering operational velocity, network automation and visibility for cloud-native applications and software-defined data centers, while staying within flat IT budgets.

Enterprise data centers are challenged today to support cloud-native applications, drive business velocity and work within flat budgets.

Network layer is often cited as the least agile part of data center infrastructure,especially when compared to compute infrastructure. The advent of virtualization changed the server landscape and delivered operational efficiencies across management workflows via automation. Emerging cloud-native applications are expected to demand even greater agility from the underlying infrastructure.

Most data centers are built using old network architecture, a box-by-box operational paradigm that inhibits the pace of IT operations to meet the demand of modern applications and software-defined data centers. Click here for more information on the challenges.

Software-defined data center is demanding network innovation. With virtualization going mainstream, networks are required to provide visibility into virtual machines, east-west traffic across VMs, and deliver network service connectivity easily. Networks are expected to not adversely impact software-defined data center agility by mandating manual box-by-box network configuration and upgrades. Emerging cloud-native applications require rapid application and services deployment. This demands network operations to be more automated instead of relying on manual CLI and limited GUI workflows. Lastly, infrastructure budgets trends have flat-lined in most organizations. This demands an innovative approach compared to the legacy network based on proprietary hardware that increases costs.

These network demands are met by software-defined networking (SDN) solutions. Leveraging a centralized controller, the SDN networks overcome the box-by-box operational paradigm to deliver business velocity. As applications become more distributed, SDN approaches are required for networks to become agile and automated via orchestrated workflows using RESTful APIs. By leveraging open industry-standard network hardware, SDN solutions provide vendor choice and drives down costs in a flat budget environment. This cycle of innovation has been witnessed before in the server infrastructure, driven by virtualization and containers. More recently, storage infrastructure is getting transformed as well with various software-enabled architectures.

 

Lets Dig in. Below is a overview of the Clos Fabric.

 

What are my use cases? What type of deployments support the fabric?

 

 

Who uses the product today?

 

 

How do I deploy this with my existing data center, do I need to worry about my legacy network working with Big Switch?

 

What has defined customer success?

API’s are key, how do you leverage them for automation?

 

 

How do you enable me to out scale my competitors?

 

How do you allow me to see inside my network?

 

How do you support multi tenancy?

 

 

 

 

Thanks

 

 

Roger Lund

 

Big Switch – Container Integration

I had a the opportunity of a Big Switch and Containers overview.

From the Big Switch Page above.

 

Single SDN Fabric for Multi-Container Ecosystems.

Big Cloud Fabric delivers network automation, deep visibility and rapid container-to-container troubleshooting in multi-container environments.

Containers are a new atomic unit of computing that is ideal for emerging cloud-native, distributed applications. Data center operators are evaluating various container technologies, including Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere and Red Hat OpenShift.

Containers offer a layer of abstraction, not unlike to what virtual machines offered when virtualization first arrived on the scene. However, Containers are lightweight in using the host footprint because they share an underlying operating system unlike a VM which hosts its own guest OS.

Comparison chart of VMs and Containers

Containers enable micro-services based distributed applications where an application is decomposed into multiple network-connected micro-services, with each micro-service packaged in its own container. This highly-distributed application architecture leads to tremendous increase in east-west traffic compared to monolithic applications.”

 

 

What about Bare-Metal networking Support?

 

 

Container Fabric Automation, Network visibility, and Operational Simplicity, what does that mean?

 

What about a example of container visibility?

 

 

How do I troubleshoot?

 

 

How about event monitoring, and logging?

 

Additionally watch the Big Switch Kubernetes Demo

 

 

Thanks

 

 

Roger Lund