Tagged in: ESXi

Change Host Hostname and DNS in vSphere 6.7 in vCenter.

With the release of vSphere 6.7, The interface looks a bit different.

Thus , I thought I would do a write up on how to change a ESXi Host’s Hostname and DNS in vSphere 6.7 within vCenter.

 

 

 

We are going to use the HTML 5 interface.

 

 

Lets expand to the host I just installed, and added to the cluster. In this case it is esxufss02.

 

Next, Lets click the Configure Tab.

 

Next, Lets click into Networking > TCP / IP Configuration.

 

 

Next, Click Default under TCP/IP Stack. And Click Edit.

 

Next, enter the information, and click ok.

 

 

Enjoy.

 

 

Roger L

repost: VMware ESXi Release and Build Number History as of Dec 15 2017

Repost: VMware ESXi Release and Build Number History as of Dec 15 2017

The following listings are a comprehensive collection of the flagship hypervisor product by VMware. All bold versions are downloadable releases. All patches have been named by their release names. Please note that the ESXi hypervisor is available since version 3.5.

 

So I am still learning and when i went to download esxi i was unable to download version 6.5  and it would only allow me to download version 6, being a newbie and assuming there were no major differences beween version 6 and 6.5, I did so.

But now with hindsight i understand that was not the case and i am reposting this excellent article on VMwares build history to help you avoid falling in the same trap

VMware ESXi Release and Build Number History

So what’s the difference?

the main difference apears to be with vSphere, having moved from a client app system to a HTML5 interface,  now  seeing as its a complete interface change it would be better to learn that.  But have no fear all is not lost, i now have the perfect opertunity to look into upgrade paths and learn about that!

Anyway keep tuned for the next insallment

Tchau for now.

Phil

 

 

Installing a server on our hypervisor with vSphere 6.0

Installing a server on our hypervisor with vSphere

So, where are we?

We have a virtual server with exsi hypervisor running on as a base for a virtual lab,  now as a (out of touch) windows domain admin i think installing windows server to refresh myself is a good a place as any to start. Since the last time i administered a domain was when server 2008 R2 was new and starting to get adopted, i figure ill grab myself a evaluation copy of windows server 2016 and see whats new. So I’ve grabbed an ISO of that and im ready to get started.

So here i am, a vSphere front screen,  now Inventory, Administration and Recent Tasks, seam like reassuring fields to have connecting to a hypervisor, especially when you can see power events in t the tasks pane.  looks like i’m good to go.

Now as a noob, I must confess it isn’t entirely obvious where to go to start creating virtual machines, but hey,  i figure inventory is the most likely of the options presented to me.

so opening inventory i find:

 

After that brief moment of confusion, everything is much clearer now another MMC-like window with a nice explanation of what a virtual machine is and a nice “create new virtual machine link”

that’s more like it, now i’m happy again, so lets do that and create a Virtual machine  for windows server 2016.

Up comes another great Wizzard,  prompts you for each configuration option.  Now this is so quick and easy i am basically going to accept defaults at every stage where possible, after all a vanilla 2016 install must be one of the most common tasks performed and i want to see how it does.

Just calling it testvm for now

again default storage location.

I changed from the default, to server 2016 (64bit).

Default nework configuration looks good to me.

again I accept the defaults, reducing the disk to 10Gb assuming i can always grow it if necessary

Click finish, and in a blink of an eye, its done and all i have to show for it is a new item under inventory;- testvm

looks like it worked, lets see if we can get windows installing on it

nice to not the create virtual machine task is registered in recent tasks, lets click on testvm and see what we can do,

first thing i notice is we get a toolbar with play pause and stop buttons,  hitting the play button.

does very little. apart from putting a play icon over the virtual machine, and adding a power on virtual machine event in the task log.

ok makes sense, its for virtual servers, which are usually headless and remote, and from past playing with virtual machines at cambridge i know i need to connect to the console of the virtual machine. lucky for me in the new toolbar one of the icons has a hover over tooltip that says “launch the virtual machine console”, so i hit it:

and i’m greeted by a failed pxe boot screen,  again makes sense i haven’t given it an install media and the VM is network booting by default. very useful for remote installs..

so we need to give the virtual machine a install media, i have an iso and as i’m too lazy to burn it i will try and mount it, so closing down the console and shutting down the vm, lest see if we can mount the iso to install from.  Right clicking on the testvm i have an option to edit settings..

now under CD/DVD drive Device type we have client device with a message telling us to power on the device then click on the connect cd/dvd button in the toolbar.

sounds sensible, lets try that..

on the 3rd reboot i worked out to press F2 to enter the bios of the VM in order to give me enough time to mount the ISO to boot from it.

now im not going to talk you through installing windows, i’m sure you are capable of that,   and in my next post i will mention any hurdles i had.

off to install windows, hope you enjoyed it.

Tchau for now

Phil

Hypervisor installed, what now?

Hypervisor installed so what now?

Well a hypervisor has one purpose, host and allocate resources to virtual machines. so to do that we need some way to manage the hypervisor and the virtual hardware it will provide

How do we manage esxi?  well looking at the splash screen on the esxi server we have a friendly prompt:

“Download tools to manage this server from http://192.168.159.128”

That sounds like just the ticket,  noting it’s the ip address of our newly installed esxi server. so firing up our internet browser of choice and heading over to that url…

 

We find a nice VMware EXSI welcome page, and the first paragraph suggests downloading something called vSphere to manage the server,  i liked the sound of that so i downloaded it.

Running the installer gives us a standard compressed windows package installer: (note pretty sure its going to need administrator privileges to install so i granted them when asked

lets keep it simple and install it in English!

Accept the license Agreement..

Specify the install location

Install

well that was painless, lets see what has appeared in our start menu

VMware vSphere Client, that’s new lets take a look.

.

ok, the first thing the cvlient wats to do is connect to a server to manage, so i enter the IP of our new esxi server and the root credentials i set at install

Now as this is a home lab to play around with i don’t have a certificate authority, so vSphere will prompt to accept the self signed certificate the first time you connect.

Success!

vSphere has successfully been downloaded, installed, and connected to a remote hypervisor.  In what can only be described as a super slick, fast and intuitive process.

I find it very exciting that this process is all that is involved in deploying new hardware in a virtualised environment,  install the hypervisor on the bare metal and connect it up to the existing infrastructure. the rest can be done remotely.

 

Now, next up lets install a server on our hypervisor and get to know vSphere a little

Tchau for now

 

Phil

 

Uila – A view into your data center.

I recently had the chance to get a product overview of Uila.

 

What product does Uila have?

 

“Uila’s Application-Centric Infrastructure Monitoring Monitoring helps align business and IT Operations goals in a single product by providing IT Operations with the application visibility and correlated network, compute and storage insights for Private, Public and Hybrid Cloud-based Data Centers (such as VMWare, Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, Docker Container, etc.).  “

 

Ever need to see why your developer or application owner are indicating your virtual environment is causing performance issues to their application?? Of course, it’s not VMware, but it couple be something between the virtualization layer and the application layer causing performance issues.

 

 

 

 

Sounds Great. But what does that mean? How does it work?

 

 

 

 

How do I see into my environment ?

 

 

 

Uila Shows real time, and backwards in time so you can click and dig in.

 

 

Then you can dig into Application Analysis to see what is causing the problem.

 

 

Once you find the problem, in this case Oracle_11g-n1 looks suspect..  You can dig farther in.

 

 

 

Of course you can do a root cause view.

 

And find the problem.

 

 

 

 

For more information on Uila.

 

Videos

 

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Company Overview
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pgzx14PRpOs
http://vimeo.com/202704462

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Application Visibility and Root Cause
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1PeWccQZ5g
http://vimeo.com/202698494

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Infrastructure Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjH2CPdFT0s
http://vimeo.com/202701527

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – End User Experience Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-1ExHbRGgI
http://vimeo.com/202702132

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Virtual Network Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufqMYFVBlMA
http://vimeo.com/202702496

 

Data Sheet
http://uila.com/download/datasets/920/Uila_Datasheet_FullStack_Virtualization_Apr_2017.pdf

 

Check them out.

 

Thanks

 

Roger Lund

Register Storage Providers for Virtual Volumes? Why VVOL’S?

One of the main reasons I wanted to upgrade my lab to vSphere 6.5 was to play with VVOL’s or Virtual Volumes.

Why VVOL’s? Good Question. Lets Look at what is new in Virtual Volumes.

 


 

See What’s New: vSphere Virtual Volumes

Source http://www.vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/products/virtualvolumes/vmware-whats-new-vsphere-virtual-volumes.pdf

 

“By transitioning from the legacy storage model to Software-Defined Storage with Virtual Volumes, customers will gain the following benefits:

 

  • Automation of storage “class-of-service” at scale: Provision virtual machines quickly across data center using a common control plane (SPBM) for automation.
  • Self-Service capabilities: Empower application administrators with cloud automation tool integration (vRealize Automation, PowerCLI, OpenStack).
  •  Simple change management using policies: Eliminate change management overhead and use policies to drive infrastructure changes.
  • Finer control of storage class of service: Match VM storage requirements exactly as needed with class of service delivered per VM.
  • Effective monitoring/troubleshooting with per VM visibility: Gain visibility on individual VM performance and storage consumption.
  • Non-disruptive transition: Use existing protocols (Fiber channel, ISCSI, NFS) across heterogeneous storage devices.
  • Safeguard existing investment: Use existing resources more efficiently with an operational model that eliminates inefficient static and rigid storage constructs.

Sounds good, Since I have a Solidfire in my lab that supports it, and it’s enabled. Whats first?

 


 

The first step is to Register the Storage Provider.

 

“Your Virtual Volumes environment must include storage providers, also called VASA providers. Typically, third-party vendors develop storage providers through the VMware APIs for Storage Awareness (VASA). Storage providers facilitate communication between vSphere and the storage side. You must register the storage provider in vCenter Server to be able to work with Virtual Volumes.

After registration, the Virtual Volumes provider communicates with vCenter Server. The provider reports characteristics of underlying storage and data services, such as replication, that the storage system provides. The characteristics appear in the VM Storage Policies interface and can be used to create a VM storage policy compatible with the Virtual Volumes datastore. After you apply this storage policy to a virtual machine, the policy is pushed to Virtual Volumes storage. The policy enforces optimal placement of the virtual machine within Virtual Volumes storage and guarantees that storage can satisfy virtual machine requirements. If your storage provides extra services, such as caching or replication, the policy enables these services for the virtual machine.

Verify that an appropriate version of the Virtual Volumes storage provider is installed on the storage side. Obtain credentials of the storage provider.

1

Browse to vCenter Server in the vSphere Web Client navigator.

2

Click the Configure tab, and click Storage Providers.

3

Click the Register a new storage provider icon ().

4

Type connection information for the storage provider, including the name, URL, and credentials.

5

Specify the security method.

Action

Description

Direct vCenter Server to the storage provider certificate

Select the Use storage provider certificate option and specify the certificate’s location.

Use a thumbprint of the storage provider certificate

If you do not direct vCenter Server to the provider certificate, the certificate thumbprint is displayed. You can check the thumbprint and approve it. vCenter Server adds the certificate to the truststore and proceeds with the connection.

The storage provider adds the vCenter Server certificate to its truststore when vCenter Server first connects to the provider.

6

To complete the registration, click OK.

vCenter Server discovers and registers the Virtual Volumes storage provider.

Next up. Making a Datastore within it.

Roger L

Install VMware tools on Centos 7

I was standing up some Centos 7 boxes in VMware vSphere. And I figured I would blog on the steps to install VMware Tools.

 

The below Steps are taken from http://partnerweb.vmware.com/GOSIG/CentOS_7.html

 

 “CentOS 7 documentation covers information on how to install the operating system in a virtual machine. For additional information about the operating system, refer to the instructions included in the installation media.

CentOS 7 documentation includes the following topics:

Installation Instructions

To install CentOS 7 in a virtual machine you can use either the standard CentOS distribution CD or the boot floppy/network method. The following installation instructions are for standard distribution CD.

Prerequisites

Before you begin, verify that the following tasks are complete:

Installation Steps

  1. Insert the CentOS 7 CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive.
  2. Power on the virtual machine to start installing CentOS 7.
  3. Follow the prompts to complete the installation.
  4. Set the storage location for installation. In the INSTALLATION SUMMARY screen, in the STORAGE session area, select INSTALLATION DESTINATION.
  5. Change the Base Environment and select Add-Ons to install. In the INSTALLATION SUMMARY screen, in the SOFTWARE session area, click SOFTWARE SELECTION.CentOS 7 includes Open VMware Tools. The default Base Environment is Minimal install, which only has basic functionality.
    • For Minimal install and Virtualization Host environments, Open VMware Tools is not available during installation.
      After CentOS 7 installation, to install Open VMware Tools, using root privileges, run the command:
      # yum install open-vm-tools
    • For other types of Base Environments, to install Open VMware Tools, select the Guest Agents Add-On.
    • If this Add-On is not listed, the Base Environment already includes Open VMware Tools and installs it by default.
  6. Click Done.
  7. Click Begin Installation to continue.
  8. Set root password and create new users, as needed, in the CONFIGURATION screen.

VMware Tools in an CentOS 7 Guest

Use the guest OS provided Open VM Tools or install VMware Tools, as needed.

Open VM Tools

Open VM Tools is the open source implementation of VMware Tools and consist of a suite of virtualization utilities that improves the functionality, administration, and management of virtual machines on VMware hypervisors. VMware recommends using the Open VM Tools redistributed by the operating system vendors. To use Open VM Tools:

  1. Add the vmhgfs Driver
    If you use the file sharing feature by using Shared Folders in VMware Workstation and Fusion, install the vmhgfs driver in the virtual machine. This driver is not included inbox in the operating system. Installing the additional vmhgfs driver does not disturb the other inbox VMware drivers or Open VMware Tools. To install this driver:

    1. Install Open VMware Tools.
    2. Install the traditional TAR Format VMware Tools that is bundled with VMware Workstation or Fusion products.
  2. Add the deployPkg Tools Plug-in
    If you are using the virtual machine as a template or if it will be protected by SRM (Site Recovery Manager), then install the deployPkg Tools plug-in. To install this plug-in:

    1. Create a file, /etc/yum.repos.d/vmware-tools.repo, with the following content:
      [vmware-tools]
      name = VMware Tools
      baseurl = http://packages.vmware.com/packages/rhel7/x86_64/
      enabled = 1
      gpgcheck = 1
    2. Install the package:
      $ sudo yum install open-vm-tools-deploypkg
      See knowledge base article 2075048, Installing the deployPkg plug-in in a Linux virtual machine, at http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2075048.

For additional information, see:

VMware Tools

For additional information on VMware Tools, see knowledge base article 1014294, General VMware Tools installation instructions, at http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1014294.

Knowledge Base Articles for CentOS 7

The following link refers to knowledge base articles on operating system specific issues. See VMware Knowledge Base for a list of known issues about the operating system.

VMware Compatibility Guide

The VMware Compatibility Guide Web site lists supported guest and host operating systems and provides related support information.”

 

 

Here we go.

 

  1. Login to the linux guest via putty.
  2. Login as root:
  3. [email protected]’s password. I entered the password.
  4. # yum install open-vm-tools -y

Then I wanted to update Centos as well.

 

  1. yum update -y
  2. shutdown -r -t now

 

Now lets look at the VM in the vSphere client.

 

 

 

 

centos7_vmware_tools_vm_selection centos7_vmware_tools_install

Now we have Running VMware Tools!

 

 

Roger L