Tagged in: ESXi

Register Storage Providers for Virtual Volumes? Why VVOL’S?

One of the main reasons I wanted to upgrade my lab to vSphere 6.5 was to play with VVOL’s or Virtual Volumes.

Why VVOL’s? Good Question. Lets Look at what is new in Virtual Volumes.

 


 

See What’s New: vSphere Virtual Volumes

Source http://www.vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/products/virtualvolumes/vmware-whats-new-vsphere-virtual-volumes.pdf

 

“By transitioning from the legacy storage model to Software-Defined Storage with Virtual Volumes, customers will gain the following benefits:

 

  • Automation of storage “class-of-service” at scale: Provision virtual machines quickly across data center using a common control plane (SPBM) for automation.
  • Self-Service capabilities: Empower application administrators with cloud automation tool integration (vRealize Automation, PowerCLI, OpenStack).
  •  Simple change management using policies: Eliminate change management overhead and use policies to drive infrastructure changes.
  • Finer control of storage class of service: Match VM storage requirements exactly as needed with class of service delivered per VM.
  • Effective monitoring/troubleshooting with per VM visibility: Gain visibility on individual VM performance and storage consumption.
  • Non-disruptive transition: Use existing protocols (Fiber channel, ISCSI, NFS) across heterogeneous storage devices.
  • Safeguard existing investment: Use existing resources more efficiently with an operational model that eliminates inefficient static and rigid storage constructs.

Sounds good, Since I have a Solidfire in my lab that supports it, and it’s enabled. Whats first?

 


 

The first step is to Register the Storage Provider.

 

“Your Virtual Volumes environment must include storage providers, also called VASA providers. Typically, third-party vendors develop storage providers through the VMware APIs for Storage Awareness (VASA). Storage providers facilitate communication between vSphere and the storage side. You must register the storage provider in vCenter Server to be able to work with Virtual Volumes.

After registration, the Virtual Volumes provider communicates with vCenter Server. The provider reports characteristics of underlying storage and data services, such as replication, that the storage system provides. The characteristics appear in the VM Storage Policies interface and can be used to create a VM storage policy compatible with the Virtual Volumes datastore. After you apply this storage policy to a virtual machine, the policy is pushed to Virtual Volumes storage. The policy enforces optimal placement of the virtual machine within Virtual Volumes storage and guarantees that storage can satisfy virtual machine requirements. If your storage provides extra services, such as caching or replication, the policy enables these services for the virtual machine.

Verify that an appropriate version of the Virtual Volumes storage provider is installed on the storage side. Obtain credentials of the storage provider.

1

Browse to vCenter Server in the vSphere Web Client navigator.

2

Click the Configure tab, and click Storage Providers.

3

Click the Register a new storage provider icon ().

4

Type connection information for the storage provider, including the name, URL, and credentials.

5

Specify the security method.

Action

Description

Direct vCenter Server to the storage provider certificate

Select the Use storage provider certificate option and specify the certificate’s location.

Use a thumbprint of the storage provider certificate

If you do not direct vCenter Server to the provider certificate, the certificate thumbprint is displayed. You can check the thumbprint and approve it. vCenter Server adds the certificate to the truststore and proceeds with the connection.

The storage provider adds the vCenter Server certificate to its truststore when vCenter Server first connects to the provider.

6

To complete the registration, click OK.

vCenter Server discovers and registers the Virtual Volumes storage provider.

Next up. Making a Datastore within it.

Roger L

Install VMware tools on Centos 7

I was standing up some Centos 7 boxes in VMware vSphere. And I figured I would blog on the steps to install VMware Tools.

 

The below Steps are taken from http://partnerweb.vmware.com/GOSIG/CentOS_7.html

 

 “CentOS 7 documentation covers information on how to install the operating system in a virtual machine. For additional information about the operating system, refer to the instructions included in the installation media.

CentOS 7 documentation includes the following topics:

Installation Instructions

To install CentOS 7 in a virtual machine you can use either the standard CentOS distribution CD or the boot floppy/network method. The following installation instructions are for standard distribution CD.

Prerequisites

Before you begin, verify that the following tasks are complete:

Installation Steps

  1. Insert the CentOS 7 CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive.
  2. Power on the virtual machine to start installing CentOS 7.
  3. Follow the prompts to complete the installation.
  4. Set the storage location for installation. In the INSTALLATION SUMMARY screen, in the STORAGE session area, select INSTALLATION DESTINATION.
  5. Change the Base Environment and select Add-Ons to install. In the INSTALLATION SUMMARY screen, in the SOFTWARE session area, click SOFTWARE SELECTION.CentOS 7 includes Open VMware Tools. The default Base Environment is Minimal install, which only has basic functionality.
    • For Minimal install and Virtualization Host environments, Open VMware Tools is not available during installation.
      After CentOS 7 installation, to install Open VMware Tools, using root privileges, run the command:
      # yum install open-vm-tools
    • For other types of Base Environments, to install Open VMware Tools, select the Guest Agents Add-On.
    • If this Add-On is not listed, the Base Environment already includes Open VMware Tools and installs it by default.
  6. Click Done.
  7. Click Begin Installation to continue.
  8. Set root password and create new users, as needed, in the CONFIGURATION screen.

VMware Tools in an CentOS 7 Guest

Use the guest OS provided Open VM Tools or install VMware Tools, as needed.

Open VM Tools

Open VM Tools is the open source implementation of VMware Tools and consist of a suite of virtualization utilities that improves the functionality, administration, and management of virtual machines on VMware hypervisors. VMware recommends using the Open VM Tools redistributed by the operating system vendors. To use Open VM Tools:

  1. Add the vmhgfs Driver
    If you use the file sharing feature by using Shared Folders in VMware Workstation and Fusion, install the vmhgfs driver in the virtual machine. This driver is not included inbox in the operating system. Installing the additional vmhgfs driver does not disturb the other inbox VMware drivers or Open VMware Tools. To install this driver:

    1. Install Open VMware Tools.
    2. Install the traditional TAR Format VMware Tools that is bundled with VMware Workstation or Fusion products.
  2. Add the deployPkg Tools Plug-in
    If you are using the virtual machine as a template or if it will be protected by SRM (Site Recovery Manager), then install the deployPkg Tools plug-in. To install this plug-in:

    1. Create a file, /etc/yum.repos.d/vmware-tools.repo, with the following content:
      [fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][vmware-tools]
      name = VMware Tools
      baseurl = http://packages.vmware.com/packages/rhel7/x86_64/
      enabled = 1
      gpgcheck = 1
    2. Install the package:
      $ sudo yum install open-vm-tools-deploypkg
      See knowledge base article 2075048, Installing the deployPkg plug-in in a Linux virtual machine, at http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2075048.

For additional information, see:

VMware Tools

For additional information on VMware Tools, see knowledge base article 1014294, General VMware Tools installation instructions, at http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1014294.

Knowledge Base Articles for CentOS 7

The following link refers to knowledge base articles on operating system specific issues. See VMware Knowledge Base for a list of known issues about the operating system.

VMware Compatibility Guide

The VMware Compatibility Guide Web site lists supported guest and host operating systems and provides related support information.”

 

 

Here we go.

 

  1. Login to the linux guest via putty.
  2. Login as root:
  3. root@192.x.x.x.1’s password. I entered the password.
  4. # yum install open-vm-tools -y

Then I wanted to update Centos as well.

 

  1. yum update -y
  2. shutdown -r -t now

 

Now lets look at the VM in the vSphere client.

 

 

 

 

centos7_vmware_tools_vm_selection centos7_vmware_tools_install

Now we have Running VMware Tools!

 

 

Roger L[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

My vCenter C: drive ran out of space

I came across something interesting today. The 160 GB C: drive on my vCenter Server ran out of space today…rather embarrassing. The first thing I checked is why in the heck my alerts didn’t go off…ok..problem fixed. After a couple of Google searches I came across and interesting VMware KB. Apparently there is a bug in the vCenter 5.5 upgrade that enables debug logging on the VMware Syslog Collector service and logs to C:\ProgramData\VMware\VMware Syslog Collector\logs\debug.log. In this case, my debug log was 62GB. The fix is rather simple. Stop the ‘VMware Syslog Collector’ service and edit the C:\ProgramData\VMware\VMware Syslog Collector\vmconfig-syslog.xml file (make a copy of it first) and change the following:

<debug> <level>1</level> </debug>

to

<debug> <level>0</level> </debug>

 

Remove the debug.log file and start the service again.

 

After upgrading to vCenter Server 5.5, the debug.log file of syslog collector is growing without limit (2094175)

KB: 2094175

  • Updated: Mar 3, 2015
  • Categories:
    Troubleshooting
  • Languages:
    English
  • Product(s):
    VMware vCenter Server
  • Product Version(s):
    VMware vCenter Server 5.5.x

 

Symptoms

  • After upgrading to vCenter Server 5.5, the debug.log file of syslog collector is growing without limit
  • C:\ProgramData\VMware\VMware Syslog Collector\logs\debug.log continues to grow without being rotated

Resolution

This is a known issue affecting VMware Syslog Collector 5.5.

 

Currently, there is no resolution.

To work around this issue:

  1. Stop the VMware Syslog Collector service. For more information, see Stopping, starting, or restarting VMware vCenter Server services (1003895).
  2. On the server running the VMware Syslog Collector service, navigate to C:\ProgramData\VMware\VMware Syslog Collector and save a copy of vmconfig-syslog.xml.
  3. In a text editor, open vmconfig-syslog.xml and modify  from:

    <debug> <level>1</level> </debug>

    to

    <debug> <level>0</level> </debug>

  4. Start the VMware Syslog Collector service. For more information, see Stopping, starting, or restarting VMware vCenter Server services (1003895).

 

-Aaron

Repost : with a few additions: What is my SSO Domain Name & Site Name?

I had to use this today after forgetting a little used VMware Workstation Lab’s vSphere 6 sso domain.

 

I ended up finding this blog post, and i’m going to refer to it in my blog post as well.

vCenter Server 6.0 Tidbits Part 2: What is my SSO Domain Name & Site Name?

 

You will find it in the following two configuration files:

Windows:

C:\ProgramData\VMware\vCenterServer\cfg\install-defaults\vmdir.domain-name

VCSA:

/etc/vmware/install-defaults/vmdir.domain-name

You have to enable shell via ssh to vcenter first.

login to vcenter via ssh. I enabled this by default.

If not do the below steps or skip this section if ssh is enabled.

—————————————-

How to enable ssh on the vcenter appliance

 

by 

1. Open the console of the appliance using in this case the vsphere client.

2. Press F2 and log in as root.

3. Notice the choices and select Troubleshooting Mode Options.

4. Notice the two options. Select Enable SSH.

5.  Press Enter to enable it.

—————————————-

Command> shell.set –enabled True
Command> shell

localhost:~ # vi /etc/vmware/install-defaults/vmdir.domain-name

This returned

ssolocal.local

Thus I knew I had to login to Administrator@ssolocal.local to vcenter.

P.S. Document your lab login and sso information… :0)

Roger L