Tagged in: vSphere

Change Host Hostname and DNS in vSphere 6.7 in vCenter.

With the release of vSphere 6.7, The interface looks a bit different.

Thus , I thought I would do a write up on how to change a ESXi Host’s Hostname and DNS in vSphere 6.7 within vCenter.

 

 

 

We are going to use the HTML 5 interface.

 

 

Lets expand to the host I just installed, and added to the cluster. In this case it is esxufss02.

 

Next, Lets click the Configure Tab.

 

Next, Lets click into Networking > TCP / IP Configuration.

 

 

Next, Click Default under TCP/IP Stack. And Click Edit.

 

Next, enter the information, and click ok.

 

 

Enjoy.

 

 

Roger L

repost: VMware ESXi Release and Build Number History as of Dec 15 2017

Repost: VMware ESXi Release and Build Number History as of Dec 15 2017

The following listings are a comprehensive collection of the flagship hypervisor product by VMware. All bold versions are downloadable releases. All patches have been named by their release names. Please note that the ESXi hypervisor is available since version 3.5.

 

So I am still learning and when i went to download esxi i was unable to download version 6.5  and it would only allow me to download version 6, being a newbie and assuming there were no major differences beween version 6 and 6.5, I did so.

But now with hindsight i understand that was not the case and i am reposting this excellent article on VMwares build history to help you avoid falling in the same trap

VMware ESXi Release and Build Number History

So what’s the difference?

the main difference apears to be with vSphere, having moved from a client app system to a HTML5 interface,  now  seeing as its a complete interface change it would be better to learn that.  But have no fear all is not lost, i now have the perfect opertunity to look into upgrade paths and learn about that!

Anyway keep tuned for the next insallment

Tchau for now.

Phil

 

 

Hypervisor installed, what now?

Hypervisor installed so what now?

Well a hypervisor has one purpose, host and allocate resources to virtual machines. so to do that we need some way to manage the hypervisor and the virtual hardware it will provide

How do we manage esxi?  well looking at the splash screen on the esxi server we have a friendly prompt:

“Download tools to manage this server from http://192.168.159.128”

That sounds like just the ticket,  noting it’s the ip address of our newly installed esxi server. so firing up our internet browser of choice and heading over to that url…

 

We find a nice VMware EXSI welcome page, and the first paragraph suggests downloading something called vSphere to manage the server,  i liked the sound of that so i downloaded it.

Running the installer gives us a standard compressed windows package installer: (note pretty sure its going to need administrator privileges to install so i granted them when asked

lets keep it simple and install it in English!

Accept the license Agreement..

Specify the install location

Install

well that was painless, lets see what has appeared in our start menu

VMware vSphere Client, that’s new lets take a look.

.

ok, the first thing the cvlient wats to do is connect to a server to manage, so i enter the IP of our new esxi server and the root credentials i set at install

Now as this is a home lab to play around with i don’t have a certificate authority, so vSphere will prompt to accept the self signed certificate the first time you connect.

Success!

vSphere has successfully been downloaded, installed, and connected to a remote hypervisor.  In what can only be described as a super slick, fast and intuitive process.

I find it very exciting that this process is all that is involved in deploying new hardware in a virtualised environment,  install the hypervisor on the bare metal and connect it up to the existing infrastructure. the rest can be done remotely.

 

Now, next up lets install a server on our hypervisor and get to know vSphere a little

Tchau for now

 

Phil

 

Repost : What is vNIC, VMKNIC, PortGroups, Uplink Ports, vPorts and VMXNET3 Adapter

Studying NSX, I found that a review of the differences between vmnics, vNIC’s, and the terminology where in order.

 

I thought this blog post did a good job of over viewing the terms.

 

What is vNIC, VMKNIC, PortGroups, Uplink Ports, vPorts and VMXNET3 Adapter

 

Virtual Networking is one of the Key components of Datacenter. If all your Critical VMs running on highly redundant & high speed SAN or Ethernet Network but if VMs can’t communicate with each other then everything is useless.
From Functioning perspective, Virtual Network in VMware is similar to Physical Networks. Like Physical networking, Virtual networking is also exercises TCP/IP stack so nothing is changed underneath.
But Virtual networking has introduced many new components or its complex terminology which is sufficient enough to confuse any new admin or anyone who is trying to familiar with VMware Networking.

In this post, I will try to make you guys familiar with VMware Networking components, Its terminology and significance of each Networking Component.”

 

What is vNIC, VMKNIC, PortGroups, Uplink Ports, vPorts and VMXNET3 Adapter

 

Source and all credit to http://www.govmlab.com

 

Uila – A view into your data center.

I recently had the chance to get a product overview of Uila.

 

What product does Uila have?

 

“Uila’s Application-Centric Infrastructure Monitoring Monitoring helps align business and IT Operations goals in a single product by providing IT Operations with the application visibility and correlated network, compute and storage insights for Private, Public and Hybrid Cloud-based Data Centers (such as VMWare, Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, Docker Container, etc.).  “

 

Ever need to see why your developer or application owner are indicating your virtual environment is causing performance issues to their application?? Of course, it’s not VMware, but it couple be something between the virtualization layer and the application layer causing performance issues.

 

 

 

 

Sounds Great. But what does that mean? How does it work?

 

 

 

 

How do I see into my environment ?

 

 

 

Uila Shows real time, and backwards in time so you can click and dig in.

 

 

Then you can dig into Application Analysis to see what is causing the problem.

 

 

Once you find the problem, in this case Oracle_11g-n1 looks suspect..  You can dig farther in.

 

 

 

Of course you can do a root cause view.

 

And find the problem.

 

 

 

 

For more information on Uila.

 

Videos

 

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Company Overview
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pgzx14PRpOs
http://vimeo.com/202704462

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Application Visibility and Root Cause
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1PeWccQZ5g
http://vimeo.com/202698494

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Infrastructure Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjH2CPdFT0s
http://vimeo.com/202701527

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – End User Experience Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-1ExHbRGgI
http://vimeo.com/202702132

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Virtual Network Monitoring
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufqMYFVBlMA
http://vimeo.com/202702496

 

Data Sheet
http://uila.com/download/datasets/920/Uila_Datasheet_FullStack_Virtualization_Apr_2017.pdf

 

Check them out.

 

Thanks

 

Roger Lund

My vSphere 6.5 Upgrade Checklist – painful : Repost

I ran across this post when reviewing VMware vSphere 6.5 upgrade best practices via google.

I like to read about others and what they experience while upgrading prior to running through a upgrade myself.

 

by Michael White

https://notesfrommwhite.net/2017/01/29/my-vsphere-6-5-upgrade-checklist-painful/

 

“Yes, this has taken me a while to get too. And it took me a while to do as well. Now that I work at Veeam, and while I have used Veeam products for many years, now I need to work my lab like a Veeam customer. vSphere 6.5 is a big deal for me, and it has a lot of new stuff in it that I am looking forward to so I have been waiting anxiously for Update 1 for Veeam that supports 6.5. It is here now but there is still one more tool of mine that is not 6.5 capable but I am tired of waiting for it. It is the VMware Infrastructure Navigator (VIN) and I find it most useful. BTW, I do this article, and then with it as a plan I do the upgrade. After that I update the article with anything I learned and then finally I publish. I will keep in this article the problems I had in case it helps someone.”

I thought it was worth the time to read.

Roger L

 

Install VMware tools on Centos 7

I was standing up some Centos 7 boxes in VMware vSphere. And I figured I would blog on the steps to install VMware Tools.

 

The below Steps are taken from http://partnerweb.vmware.com/GOSIG/CentOS_7.html

 

 “CentOS 7 documentation covers information on how to install the operating system in a virtual machine. For additional information about the operating system, refer to the instructions included in the installation media.

CentOS 7 documentation includes the following topics:

Installation Instructions

To install CentOS 7 in a virtual machine you can use either the standard CentOS distribution CD or the boot floppy/network method. The following installation instructions are for standard distribution CD.

Prerequisites

Before you begin, verify that the following tasks are complete:

Installation Steps

  1. Insert the CentOS 7 CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive.
  2. Power on the virtual machine to start installing CentOS 7.
  3. Follow the prompts to complete the installation.
  4. Set the storage location for installation. In the INSTALLATION SUMMARY screen, in the STORAGE session area, select INSTALLATION DESTINATION.
  5. Change the Base Environment and select Add-Ons to install. In the INSTALLATION SUMMARY screen, in the SOFTWARE session area, click SOFTWARE SELECTION.CentOS 7 includes Open VMware Tools. The default Base Environment is Minimal install, which only has basic functionality.
    • For Minimal install and Virtualization Host environments, Open VMware Tools is not available during installation.
      After CentOS 7 installation, to install Open VMware Tools, using root privileges, run the command:
      # yum install open-vm-tools
    • For other types of Base Environments, to install Open VMware Tools, select the Guest Agents Add-On.
    • If this Add-On is not listed, the Base Environment already includes Open VMware Tools and installs it by default.
  6. Click Done.
  7. Click Begin Installation to continue.
  8. Set root password and create new users, as needed, in the CONFIGURATION screen.

VMware Tools in an CentOS 7 Guest

Use the guest OS provided Open VM Tools or install VMware Tools, as needed.

Open VM Tools

Open VM Tools is the open source implementation of VMware Tools and consist of a suite of virtualization utilities that improves the functionality, administration, and management of virtual machines on VMware hypervisors. VMware recommends using the Open VM Tools redistributed by the operating system vendors. To use Open VM Tools:

  1. Add the vmhgfs Driver
    If you use the file sharing feature by using Shared Folders in VMware Workstation and Fusion, install the vmhgfs driver in the virtual machine. This driver is not included inbox in the operating system. Installing the additional vmhgfs driver does not disturb the other inbox VMware drivers or Open VMware Tools. To install this driver:

    1. Install Open VMware Tools.
    2. Install the traditional TAR Format VMware Tools that is bundled with VMware Workstation or Fusion products.
  2. Add the deployPkg Tools Plug-in
    If you are using the virtual machine as a template or if it will be protected by SRM (Site Recovery Manager), then install the deployPkg Tools plug-in. To install this plug-in:

    1. Create a file, /etc/yum.repos.d/vmware-tools.repo, with the following content:
      [vmware-tools]
      name = VMware Tools
      baseurl = http://packages.vmware.com/packages/rhel7/x86_64/
      enabled = 1
      gpgcheck = 1
    2. Install the package:
      $ sudo yum install open-vm-tools-deploypkg
      See knowledge base article 2075048, Installing the deployPkg plug-in in a Linux virtual machine, at http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2075048.

For additional information, see:

VMware Tools

For additional information on VMware Tools, see knowledge base article 1014294, General VMware Tools installation instructions, at http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1014294.

Knowledge Base Articles for CentOS 7

The following link refers to knowledge base articles on operating system specific issues. See VMware Knowledge Base for a list of known issues about the operating system.

VMware Compatibility Guide

The VMware Compatibility Guide Web site lists supported guest and host operating systems and provides related support information.”

 

 

Here we go.

 

  1. Login to the linux guest via putty.
  2. Login as root:
  3. [email protected]’s password. I entered the password.
  4. # yum install open-vm-tools -y

Then I wanted to update Centos as well.

 

  1. yum update -y
  2. shutdown -r -t now

 

Now lets look at the VM in the vSphere client.

 

 

 

 

centos7_vmware_tools_vm_selection centos7_vmware_tools_install

Now we have Running VMware Tools!

 

 

Roger L