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Scale on the up with Scale computing Hypercore 7.3 and Hardware updates

Scale on the up with Scale computing Hypercore 7.3 and Hardware updates

Scale Computing have been making waves in the hyperconvergence world and their recent announcement of hardware updates and new admin friendly additions to their HyperCore management software are sure to continue to impress. Especially considering the recent News of their HC3 cloud utility integrating HC3 Scale’s excellent seamlessly with Google’s cloud platform, allowing unthought of (for me anyway) IT agility for anyone with existing VMware virtualized infrastructure or those wishing to implement one. Any company can buy a complete HCI package from Scale with assured futureproofing and effortless upscaling on premises or off
Now let’s turn to the HyperCore 7.3 updates and hardware releases from scale, I got hold of some slides for your enjoyment.

As you can see, some impressive updates with all flash systems now available with incresed storage utiliztion, furthermore I.T. departments should be pleased with a multi-user interface, allowing greater tracking in multi-admin IT departments.
Stay tuned for more details on the HC3 Cloud utility form Scale….


Let’s get started…. with VMware workstation pro (12)

Let’s get started….

So, I need to learn about VMware, what’s the best way to go about it I asked myself?  Jump on In and install VMware workstation pro (12) and have a play!

My desktop has 8 4ghz cores, 24 gigs of ram and a few terabytes of disk, I think I should be fine. So, of to to download VMware workstation 12 after creating a free account.

I`m running windows so ill grab the appropriate version, I have a key for version 12 so that’s what I’m getting, the 400ish Mbyte download is quick and slick, as is the installer to follow, the usual ELUA fare and customise options, but if you’re considering VMware you have enough knowledge I don’t have to go through the installer process the only thing of note is you get a full featured 30-day evaluationSo, if you want to play and explore the possibilities you can.

Frankly installing VMware to this point has been simple slick professional installer as to be expected from VMware’s reputation and industry standing.

Now, for learning VMware I figure I need a virtual environment, so I`m going to set up a virtual server within VMware workstation on which I will install a hypervisor (esxi) and use that as a base for a home lab.

So, let’s see what we have and open workstation for the first time…



Not unlike a Microsoft management console (MMC) window, and immediately feeling at home, with the addition of some helpful shortcuts on the home screen.

Strikes me as VMware workstation is very easy to install, for anyone with basic computer skills, and that’s great its accessible for people to learn, and it’s  quick and easy for tec-heads like me to install, and i can only imagine that as a a plus in the enterprise world..

Next time installing the hypervisor..

Tchau for now..




It Begins…


Phew, now that’s out the way, I was expecting writers block, but hey, no!


Who is this fool you ask?
Well let me introduce myself, My name is Phil Marsden and I have been invited by @rogerlund to start blogging my experiences, well at least my experiences in the world of cloud computing and virtualization. To that end I think It’s only fair that you should be familiar with the guy currently occupying your eyeballs. I met Roger through a shared love of photography and it is true, photography has become somewhat of a passion of mine, but that is unimportant for now.

What is important is I love technology and what technology can do for us, I could use a photography analogy here, old school photographers, shot film and developed their own film in a dark room patiently waiting for the developing and fixing chemicals to fix the image. They then take this fragile negative and lovingly enlarge and process a print, a process in the most professional of labs, for “instant news” may take an hour or more. Today we shoot digital, and have a 15 + Mb data dump RAW from every shot and load it and develop in digital darkrooms in a matter of minutes, not only can we replicate old systems much faster, technology allows us to go much further than ever before. Part of my love for technology comes from my background, I’m nearly 40 and I grew up in a nice southern English market town where I was always a bit of a nerd at school, never enjoyed school very much but I did well at it, and finally at the ripe old age of 18 I shipped off to university. I studied chemistry at university, which again was fascinating, and I did well at it understanding and growing in the process, but nothing really grabbed me and shouted this is what you want to do!!
In the final year of my degree we had a module called computer aided-drug design and I was hooked, hooked by the concept of a computer being able to model a chemical process. calculating a chemicals properties and interactions with other properties we could virtually screen compounds in silico or design the perfect compound for a drug to act on a specific target. Now this process wasn’t perfect, in matter of hours, or days or weeks we could come up with something that through traditional methods would have taken years with dozens of chemists synthesizing and testing compounds. In short, we could get faster and better, thanks to computers.

I was so hooked, this took me on to do my PhD at Cambridge in molecular informatics, where my project was very cool, and I got to play with stereo 3D visualization long before 3d was even in the cinema. Even in the sea of intellectuality that was the theoretical and computational chemistry department at the university of Cambridge, I was still a nerd, when it came to computers, as I gamed, and I was a poor student, I’d build my own computers, I frequently overclocked them too far and broke components, so I was always fixing something, and that carried over into my professional life and I was frequently the person asked to help out when workstations did funny things so I’d help out after (finally writing up my Ph.D.) I had nothing planned and the head of the group asked me if I wanted to stay on as a computer officer (now we are getting somewhere) and very quickly I realised it was the challenge of learning things coupled with the use of technology that gets me going!

When I joined the group IT was basically firefighting, all users had root or admin on their workstations and frankly it was a nightmare, there were network policies that defined if personal machines were allowed on the network, so this department of 2500 registered machines and around 10k registered users had a team of 7 computer officers managing everything, OS installs, upgrades, application installs, machine meltdowns network infrastructure maintenance and socket patching. It was all firefighting, there was no man power for development and departmental infrastructure.
Now I came on as an assistant to the computer officer in the Unilever centre (hello Charlotte!) and Charlotte to my eternal gratitude, instead of using me as a personal slave assistant in a very hectic work environment (which for future reference contained a “training area” of 25 identical workstations for us to host events and workshops.) decided she wanted me to manage the training area. The training area was frequently reinstalled and having various packages installed for certain workshops. Indeed, one of my first tasks was to install office 2000 on each machine, amazingly we only had one cd and it involved going to each machine in turn, powering up, logging on inserting the disk and installing office – 25 times!

Now I’m not the brightest, but even to me it seamed there must be a better way. Charlotte sat me down and said she wanted me to go on a training course for Active Directory, as she had done one “a while ago” and was “fairly sure it had the answer”. And boy was she right!

The next couple of years of my life were spent implementing a AD infrastructure in out little sub department, and as our carrot to entice the user into letting us manage their machine was a little fileserver I knocked together out of recycled bits kicking around, IIRC it had a 6TB raid 6 array. On which I gave the user space mapped as a network drive. And an assurance that any data put there needed 3 disks to die simultaneously for their data to be lost.
Over time this grew, and when charlotte went to follow her passion of marine biology and her job became available I was successfully recruited, and the domain slowly grew research group by research group. The domain also only grew thanks to a cohesive strategy emerging within the department, which resulted in departmental resources, which we spent on servers. Partly because the domain had proved its worth both in terms of network security and machine maintenance and resiliency of user data and now justified departmental resources. When we first set up the domain we used old workstations, probably 1Ghz Celerons as Domain Controllers and made sure we had enough for replication to keep us safe.

Now with investment we moved onto virtualized servers where each virtual server would be hosted on a pair of real servers with network mirrored hard drives, with automatic failover etc, System uptimes from that point on were just great 99.9% upwards.
No whilst at the university I met a lovely Brazillian doctor and we fell in love and got married, and in time my eldest son was born. Well circumstances led us down a path which resulted in us moving to Brazil and my becoming a stay at home dad.
Fast forward 7 years I was talking to my family at lunch about this opportunity to be blogging this today, and my son ended up asking “what is cloud computing?”

That’s pretty much where I am, I was a sysadmin 7 years ago I’m familiar with the concept of virtualization, I’ve run virtual machines in the real world. I’m a bit out of touch at the moment, but I am now at a point in my children’s life that I have more time to develop and a brain that still wants to learn
I eagerly accept Rogers invitation to learn about the VMware platform and blog about my experience.

Thanks Roger!



Splunk.conf Coming

Hello everyone! It has been a while since I have posted. My new job role is completely focused around Splunk these days. Splunk’s annual conference is next week in Washington DC. I will be posting news and announcements throughout the week so stay tuned for some Splunk goodness. Sometime after the conference I will work on some Splunk related posts such as installing, how to use it and some good use cases. Stay tuned!!

Netapp ‘s Soldifire HCI Overview at VMworld 2017 – Tech Field Day Extra.

Netapp ‘s Soldifire HCI Overview. I had a chance to get a overview of Netapp’s new HCI Product while at Tech Field Day Extra while attending VMworld 2017.


I’ve long been a fan of the Solidfire Technology. From the early day’s to after the purchase and the re-branding of the product into Netapp.



Solidfire has always been built on Guaranteed Performance, flexibility & scale, and automated infrastructure and the Netapp Solidfire HCI product is no different.


With Netapp’s HCI Architecture, you see standard services that you would across all Netapp Products.



Here is the appliance and the new Netapp Solidfire look!



The idea is to indepentily scale the compute or storage nodes.


One OS across the entire Solidfire Platform.


Built on a open storage model.



Grow as needed.


Node Information




Great Stuff! Looking forward to learning more!


Here is the link to the Tech Field Day Video








Roger Lund




Pluribus Networks Netvisor & Adaptive Cloud Fabric @ VMworld 2017 – Tech Field Day Extra

I had the chance to get a Netvisor And Adaptive Cloud Fabric Overview by Pluribus Networks at Tech Field Day Extra at VMworld 2017.


White box Networking has been main stream in the service provider world for some time. Plurbus has been strong in that space, but now more and more enterprise’s are looking for SDN, and exploring the White Box Networking Space. Pluribus Netvisor and Adapter Cloud Fabric is a product that can sit on these devices.


Below are the slides, and below that the video.


EDIT : Updated Slides.


Video of the Presentation.




Druva – Infrastructure Data Protection

Druva – Infrastructure Data Protection


I had a chance to have a overview with Druva at Tech Field Day Extra while attending VMworld 2017.


Druva , on demand , at scale, and cloud-first.


Druva is a as a service offering that includes the AWS costs.






Roger Lund



Kingston – NVMe Overview at VMworld 2017 – Tech Field Day Extra.

Today I’m at Tech Field Day Extra at VMword. I had the chance to sit in on a presentation by Kingston.

Overview of NVMe by @kingstontech at #TFDx #VMworld #vmworld2017 ‬


Kingston has developed and released a couple NVMe products with a read focus. Below are the slides highlighting the products.

Kc1000 card

DCP1000 SSD Datasheet.


These products are focused on Read Intensive use cases like VDI.


Below are the Slides from the Presentation. Edit : Updated Slides. Videos are below.







Kingston can be found on:




Roger Lund


Uila – A view into your data center.

I recently had the chance to get a product overview of Uila.


What product does Uila have?


“Uila’s Application-Centric Infrastructure Monitoring Monitoring helps align business and IT Operations goals in a single product by providing IT Operations with the application visibility and correlated network, compute and storage insights for Private, Public and Hybrid Cloud-based Data Centers (such as VMWare, Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, Docker Container, etc.).  “


Ever need to see why your developer or application owner are indicating your virtual environment is causing performance issues to their application?? Of course, it’s not VMware, but it couple be something between the virtualization layer and the application layer causing performance issues.





Sounds Great. But what does that mean? How does it work?





How do I see into my environment ?




Uila Shows real time, and backwards in time so you can click and dig in.



Then you can dig into Application Analysis to see what is causing the problem.



Once you find the problem, in this case Oracle_11g-n1 looks suspect..  You can dig farther in.




Of course you can do a root cause view.


And find the problem.





For more information on Uila.




Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Company Overview

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Application Visibility and Root Cause

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Infrastructure Monitoring

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – End User Experience Monitoring

Tech Field Day Presentation by Uila – Virtual Network Monitoring


Data Sheet


Check them out.




Roger Lund

Big Switch – Big Cloud Fabric

A overview of Big Cloud Fabric


Big Switch labels Big Cloud Fabric, the ” Next-Gen Data Center Switching Fabric

From the above Link.

Big Cloud Fabric™ is the next-generation data center switching fabric delivering operational velocity, network automation and visibility for cloud-native applications and software-defined data centers, while staying within flat IT budgets.

Enterprise data centers are challenged today to support cloud-native applications, drive business velocity and work within flat budgets.

Network layer is often cited as the least agile part of data center infrastructure,especially when compared to compute infrastructure. The advent of virtualization changed the server landscape and delivered operational efficiencies across management workflows via automation. Emerging cloud-native applications are expected to demand even greater agility from the underlying infrastructure.

Most data centers are built using old network architecture, a box-by-box operational paradigm that inhibits the pace of IT operations to meet the demand of modern applications and software-defined data centers. Click here for more information on the challenges.

Software-defined data center is demanding network innovation. With virtualization going mainstream, networks are required to provide visibility into virtual machines, east-west traffic across VMs, and deliver network service connectivity easily. Networks are expected to not adversely impact software-defined data center agility by mandating manual box-by-box network configuration and upgrades. Emerging cloud-native applications require rapid application and services deployment. This demands network operations to be more automated instead of relying on manual CLI and limited GUI workflows. Lastly, infrastructure budgets trends have flat-lined in most organizations. This demands an innovative approach compared to the legacy network based on proprietary hardware that increases costs.

These network demands are met by software-defined networking (SDN) solutions. Leveraging a centralized controller, the SDN networks overcome the box-by-box operational paradigm to deliver business velocity. As applications become more distributed, SDN approaches are required for networks to become agile and automated via orchestrated workflows using RESTful APIs. By leveraging open industry-standard network hardware, SDN solutions provide vendor choice and drives down costs in a flat budget environment. This cycle of innovation has been witnessed before in the server infrastructure, driven by virtualization and containers. More recently, storage infrastructure is getting transformed as well with various software-enabled architectures.


Lets Dig in. Below is a overview of the Clos Fabric.


What are my use cases? What type of deployments support the fabric?



Who uses the product today?



How do I deploy this with my existing data center, do I need to worry about my legacy network working with Big Switch?


What has defined customer success?

API’s are key, how do you leverage them for automation?



How do you enable me to out scale my competitors?


How do you allow me to see inside my network?


How do you support multi tenancy?








Roger Lund